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Journal of
Krishi Vigyan

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Journal Volumes

Year: 2017, Volume: 6, Issue: 1

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Title: Adoption Level of Recommended Agricultural Practices by Punjab Farmers

By: Arjinder Kaur and Manoj Sharma

  • Abstract

    Punjab is predominately an agrarian state and largest contributor of food grains to the central pool. In current scenario, though we have achieved great success in agricultural production and productivity and became not only self reliant but rather surplus producer of many agricultural commodities, but at the same time, we are facing a sort of crisis on many fronts. The rising cost of cultivation, stagnating yields, dwindling underground water reserves, pest resistance, resurgence of new weeds etc. are some of the concerns. To counter balance these issues farmers in the state were resorting to higher doses of nutrients, pesticides, irrigations etc. than the recommended levels. Then there are certain practices regarding residue disposal, seed treatment, soil testing etc. which also have a bearing on sustainability of state agriculture. It was found that though having good farming experience and education level, farmers of the state were not sticking to the recommended practices and resource use levels. Some constraints were cited by the sampled farmers regarding this aspect. These included higher doses of fertilizers and number of irrigations to enhance the productivity, spurious quality of pesticides leading to higher doses,stubble burning due to lack of viable alternative and low awareness about recommendation of soil testing etc. So it was found that farmers equipped with education and expertise in farming were by and large aware about the issues concerning agricultural development, but the constraints emerging mainly due to on-going mono-culture in agricultural production were posing a threat to sustainable growth in the state.

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Title: Adoption of Scientiic Farm Innovations Towards Enhancing Nutritional Security in Selected Areas of Kalimpong, West Bengal

By: Norden Lepcha, A K Bandyapadhyay and P K Pal

  • Abstract

    Among the four pillars of nutritional security viz. food availability, access, utilization, and stability, first one is the most important pillar. Agricultural technologies have a special role in developing countries, boosting the growth of the agricultural sector, hence driving the overall growth and lowering food prices. Agricultural technologies can also directly contribute to alleviate food insecurity: they can improve crops productivity allowing for higher production both for self-consumption and for increased household income, reduce risks of crop failure in case of physical shocks, such as drought or loods. In this backdrop, the present study was undertaken in Kalimpong Hills of West Bengal to assess the adoption level of agricultural technologies. Education being the most dominating factor towards adoption of farm innovations, the present study also analyzed the association of education with adoption of innovation. The study revealed that the farmers of Kalimpong hills adopted different production technologies with varied levels. It was also found that literacy level has profound effect on adoption of different scientiic farm innovations

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Title: Changes in Biochemical Parameters in Healthy and Root-Knot Nematode Infested Varieties of Ridge Gourd

By: Shobha G , Kantharaju V and Amaresh Y S

  • Abstract

    Ridge gourd (Luffa acutangul (Roxb.) is important Cucurbitaceous vegetable and susceptible host crop facing considerable yield loss due to pest and diseases. The biochemical analysis was carried out
    in resistant, moderately resistant, susceptible and highly susceptible varieties of both healthy and rootknot nematode infested roots to know the accumulation and variations in biochemical constituents with regard to total phenols, total amino acids, reducing sugar and total sugar. The infested roots of variety Arka Sumeet (830 mg/g, 0.097 mg/g) recorded signiicantly higher amount of total phenol and amino acids compared to healthy roots and all other varieties studied. Whereas, reducing sugar content was more in infested roots of variety Ridge gourd PN (15.00 mg/g) when compared to healthy roots (10.00 mg/g). Wherein, non-reducing sugar content was higher in healthy roots of variety Ridge gourd PN (12 mg/g) compared to that of infested roots (9.00 mg/g) of same variety. Whereas healthy roots of Ridge gourd PN (9.50 mg/g) recorded more of non reducing sugar compared to 6.75 mg/g in infested roots of same variety.

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Title: Comparative Analysis of Market Led Initiatives by Producer Groups in Odisha

By: Sanat Mishra, M P Nayak Mukti Mishra and B B Mishra

  • Abstract

    The study was carried out during 2013 to compare range of market-led initiatives (MLIs) pursued by 88 producer groups, covering 9 districts in the state of Odisha. Producer groups have been evolved under 5 different programs viz. Agriculture Technology Management Agency (ATMA), Swarna Jayanti Sworojagar Yojana (SJSY), Orissa Tribal Empowerment Livelihoods Project (OTELP), Farmers’ Club (FC), Western Orissa Rural Livelihoods Project (WORLP). Based on the empirical observations on collective action undertaken by the producer groups, the range of MLIs has been classiied into 5 categories viz. input aggregation, access resources (credit), access technology, value addition and marketing. Highest proportion of producer groups under ATMA, SGSY, OTELP, FC and WORLP had been reported to access technology (30.20%), access resources (30.00%), access resources (25.76%), marketing (30.13%) and access technology (29.04%) respectively. The project wise comparison of range of MLIs by X2 test recorded signiicant difference at 1% level. Thereafter, the enterprise-wise comparison of range of MLIs yielded that highest proportion of producer groups with agriculture/ horticulture, livestock/ isheries, mixed system, agri-processing and others (off-farm) enterprises undertake MLIs such as input aggregation (26.21%), access technology (28.00%), input aggregation (27.72%), marketing (28.13%) and access resources (27.17%) respectively. The X2 test conducted to compare the results of enterprisewise comparison of range of MLIs resulted in signiicant difference at 5% level. No signiicant difference was observed between MLIs when compared agro-climatic zone wise. Therefore, facilitators engaged in formation, supporting and strengthening of producer groups should inherently align the purpose of group formation with that of range of MLIs undertaken, so as to accomplish the desired outcomes.

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Title: Comparative Performance of Muskmelon (Cucumis melo) Hybrids at Farmers’ Field in District Kapurthala

By: Amandeep Kaur, Manoj Sharma, Jatinder Manan and Bindu

  • Abstract

    The performance of 10 muskmelon hybrids was studied by using an experimental design RCBD at three  locations in the district. The results revealed that the fruit diameter was maximum in Farm Glory and Sharda Chand (52.0 cm) followed by Sunny (51.2 cm) and Inthanon (48.5 cm), in case of fruit length, Sunny had maximum value (18.9 cm) followed by Sharda Chand (17.6 cm). Highest fruit weight (1900g) was observed in Sharda Chand followed by Sunny (1870g), Inthanon (1733.3g) whereas, lowest fruit weight (653.3 g) was found in Bobby followed by Kesar (741 g) and MH 27 (783 g). The data revealed that fresh seed weight of different cultivars ranged between 42.7g (Muskan) to 119.7g (Kesar) per fruit. Lowest values of cavity length and breadth were observed with bobby (8.1 cm and 5.9 cm), respectively. The overall seed cavity of Bobby was at par with Muskan, MH 27 and Kesar, which was mainly due to smaller fruit size of these hybrids, as compared to all other hybrids. It was pertinent to note that maximum fruit lesh was found in Sharda Chand (3.2 cm). TSS varied between 9.6o brix to 15.70 brix amongst different muskmelon hybrids. Maximum shelf life was observed for Inthanon and Sunny compared to other cultivars. Higher fruit yield was obtained in Farm Glory (304.2 q/ha) compared to Kesar (171.7 q/ha) followed by Sharda Chand, Sunny and Inthanon (250 to 270.8 q/ha) and Muskan, Golden Glory and Madhu yielded between (218.3 to 245.8 q/ha). Four muskmelon hybrids namely MH 27, Farm Glory, Golden Glory and Kesar possessed typical lavour and lesh colour which were most desirable in muskmelon. Out of 10 hybrids, only MH 27 possessed suture on fruit, whereas, other were having profuse netting (Farm Glory, Inthanon, Golden Glory and Sunny), scattered netting (Muskan, Madhu and Kesar) and minimum netting (Sharda Chand). Two hybrids namely Inthanon and Sunny possessed more shelf life (16.0 and 14.5 d) after  harvest and were more suitable for transportation to distant markets compared to other muskmelon hybrids.

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Title: Constraints Encountered by the Farmers in Adoption of Drip Irrigation System in District Jaipur

By: Krishna Yadav , J P Yadav and Asha Kumari

  • Abstract

    Drip irrigation is basically precise and slow application of water in the form of discrete continuous drops, sprayed through mechanical devices in to the root zone of the plants. Drip irrigation system is proitable as it saves 60-70 per cent water as compared to surface irrigation and other methods, protects the plants from diseases by minimizing humidity in atmosphere. The study was conducted in eight randomly selected gram panchayats of panchayat samiti Jhotwara of district Jaipur. Two villages were selected from each selected gram panchayat having maximum number of drip irrigation sets. Thus in all, 16villages were selected purposively. Ninety six farmers were selected on the basis of proportional allocation. The study showed that the majority (51.04 %) of farmers were found in to the category of medium constraints level where as 22.92 per cent and 26.04 per cent farmers were found into the categories of low and high constraints levels, respectively, regarding constraints faced by farmers in adoption of drip irrigation system. amongst all the constraints inancial constraints (73.30 MPS) were the most intensively perceived  followed by general constraints (72.56 MPS), technical constraints (70.74 MPS), educational constraints (69.54 MPS), miscellaneous constraints (69.02 MPS), infrastructural constraints (68.84 MPS) and climatic and geographical constraints (67.15 MPS). Under the inancial constraints, high initial cost of installing drip set was observed as the most severe constraint with 86.45 MPS. Dificulty in maintenance of DIS, regularly was most perceived general constraint by the farmers as it was perceived by 85.76 per cent farmers. Problem of blocking the drippers due to salt or other impurities in the water was most perceived technical constraints by the farmers as it was perceived by 85.76 per cent respondents. Inadequate awareness about the advantage of drip irrigation system was most perceived educational constraints.

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Title: Constraints Perceived by Agricultural Extension Personnel in Using M-Tools

By: N Kusuma Kumari, G Naveen Kumar and A Sakeer Husain

  • Abstract

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become a very important feature in the agricultural sector. m-extension is the emerging ield of ICT for providing easy access to information at any place and any time. Researchers and Extensionists are important stake holders in the development of agricultural sector. This study examines the constraints perceived by agricultural extension personnel of Kerala in using m-tools. Data were collected using a pre-structured interview schedule. Results showed that majority of the extension personnel opined that non-availability of Malayalam (local language) interface and non-availability of mobile phone networks in remote areas were the major constraints faced by them in using m-tools.

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Title: Correlation Studies on Fruit Traits of Some Mandarin Genotypes Grown Under Sub-Tropical Conditions of India

By: Gurteg Singh1, Pushpinder Singh Aulakh and Harinder Singh Rattanpal

  • Abstract

    The relationships between fruit traits of some indigenous and exotic mandarin cultivars were studied during the year 2015-16.The study revealed highly signiicant positive correlation (r = +0.801) between fruit weight and fruit juice weight followed by fruit weight and segment length (r = +0.761); fruit weight and fruit juice percentage (r = + 0.731); fruit weight and rind weight (r = +0.634) and fruit weight and fruit diameter (r = +0.634). Highly signiicant and positive correlations were also observed between fruit diameter and fruit rind weight (r = +0.505): fruit rind weight and segment length (r = +0.785); fruit rind weight and fruit juice weight (r = +0.626). Signiic ant and positive correlations were also observed between fruit rind weight and vesicle length (r = +0.538), fruit rind weight and fruit juice percentage (r = +0.491), fruit rind weight and number of segments per fruit (r = +0.481). However, negative and signiicant correlation (r = -0.534) was observed between diameter of fruit axis and fruit juice weight followed by non- signiicant negative correlation between diameter of fruit axis and total soluble solids(r = -0.386). Total soluble solids showed positive correlations with fruit juice weight (r = +0.444) and fruit juice percentage (r = +0.443) and negative correlation (r = -0.227) with fruit acidity. These correlations among different fruit traits help to understand the relationship between different mandarin genotypes and must be considered before targeting the desired traits in improvement programme

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Title: Demographic Characteristics and Constraints Faced by Farmers in West Khasi Hills district

By: E K Marbaniang and D Pasweth

  • Abstract

    A study on demographic characteristics and constraints faced by farmers inWest Khasi Hills district of Meghalaya was undertaken during 2016-17. One hundred and twenty respondents were selected by
    adopting simple random sampling. Results revealed that 37.50 per cent of the farmers belonged to the age group (31-40yr), 35.83 percent studied up to primary school and 50 percent having large size family. Majority of the farmers (45.0%) had marginal land holding, 82.50 per cent of them had low level of annual income with majority of the farmers (58.3 %) had no extension contact. Majority of the farmers (87.5%) had medium economic motivation and 54.2 per cent of them had high risk orientation with 41.7 percent of them had livestock possession of both poultry + piggery and 65.0 percent of the farmers had low training. The various constraints were non availability of inputs in time (83.33%), lack of credit on marginal interest (83.33%),luctuations in market price (83.33%) followed by lack of skill for seed and soil treatment (95.0%) in technical and general problems were uncertainty of rainfall (86.2%) and labour shortage (56.66%)

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Title: Development of Cow Dung Based Herbal Mosquito Repellent

By: Kranti Sharmaa, Sharad Mishrab and Ashutosh Dubeyc

  • Abstract

    Mosquitoes are the most important and abundant pest in urban, suburban and rural environment. Although, chemical control provides quick mortality, resistance of mosquito against the use of
    insecticides have been widely reported. Moreover, chemical mosquito repellents contain toxic synthetic pyrethroids as active ingredients whose exposure to food and water is hazardous to health. In present study, an attempt has been made to develop an eco-friendly mosquito coil containing cow dung, Neem leaves, Saw dust, loban, Tulsi, Maida and Lemon grass oil. This paper deals with selection and optimization of ingredients, their characteristics, medicinal properties and comparison with existing coil.

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Title: Development of Okra-Cutter-Holder

By: S M Nalawade, V P Kad and A V Gajakos

  • Abstract

    Okra fruits have an almost hair like bristles and prickly surface exposure to which is uncomfortable to the hands of the harvester. In extreme cases, persons with sensitive skin have developed sores or allergicreactions after a prolonged period of exposure to the pods during a harvest. Therefore to minimize above mentioned problems we developed a suitable low cost tool, okra-cutter-holder. This invention is directed okra cutter to an improved okra-cutter-holder, which permits one to harvest okra pods from a plant without touching the pod. The developed tool was tested in the laboratory as well as in the ield. The comparative tests were carried out to compare the performance of the newly developed okra-cutter-holder with the old straight blade okra plucker. The feedback from the workers was taken for ease of operation and the acceptance of the tool for the harvesting of okra. The results shown that the new tool could harvest 297-318 okra per hour (10.0 – 10.9 kg/hr) without damaging pods and also provides better protection to the hands of workers

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Title: Effect of Citrashine Coating on Post Harvest Quality of Grapefruit Cv. Star Ruby under Ambient Conditions

By: Monika Gupta and H S Rattanpal

  • Abstract

    This study was conducted to observe the effect of citrashine coating on post harvest quality of grapefruit cv. Star Ruby under ambient conditions. For this, fully mature, uniform, healthy and disease free fruits of grapefruit cv Star Ruby were individually waxed with citrashine wax and kept at ambient temperature (20- 25°C) in well ventilated room. The fruits were analyzed for physiological loss in weight, organoleptic rating, spoilage, TSS and total acids after 7, 14 and 21 d of storage. Fruits coated with citrashine wax retained their general appearance and taste after storage. The physiological loss in weight (2.58%) and spoilage (0.0%) were minimum in citrashine treated fruits after 14 d of storage as compared to uncoated fruits where physiological loss in weight was recorded as 7.01 per cent and spoilage was 4.9 per cent. The wax treated fruits showed higher organoleptic rating up to 14 d of storage. Total soluble solids increased up to 14 d of storage interval. However, acidity decreased non-signiicantly with the increase in storage interval in both the treatments.

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Title: Effect of Different Agricultural Substrates on Yield of Pleurotus sajor caju

By: Pardeep Kumar

  • Abstract

    Oyster (Pleurotus sajor-caju) was cultivated on different agricultural viz. wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), black gram straw (Vigna mungo), sesame straw (Sesamum indicum), sarson (Brassica juncea (L.) and soybean straw (Glycine max (L.) to determine the effect of these agro-waste on spawn running, fruit bodies formation and pinhead formation, yield and biological eficiency. Wheat straw showed signiicantly highest yield (8.6 % B.E.) and lesser time for spawn run 16.66 d) and pin head appearance (24.33 d). Sarson straw required more time for spawn run (23.66 d) and pin head appearance (30.66 d) and resulted less yield (2.40kg/5.0 kg substrate) with 48.0 per cent biological eficiency. The study revealed that lesser time taken to colonize the substrates is consistent with better yield and highest biological eficiency.

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Title: Effect of GA3 and NAA on Yield and Quality of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L)

By: Dalpat Singh, J R Vadodaria and B R Morwal

  • Abstract

    A ield experiment was conducted at Horticulture Instructional Farm, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar during the kharif season 2012 to study the effect of GA3 and
    NAA on yield and quality of Okra. Yield parameters like number of ingers harvested per plant, average weight of inger, yield per plant, yield per plot and yield per hectare and quality parameters like total
    number of pickings, thickness of inger and length of inger were analyzed. The experiment consisted of 16 treatments combination involving two growth regulators with four levels each (0, 25, 50 and 75 ppm). GA3 and NAA (75 ppm) was found to be the most effective in increasing more number of ingers harvested per plant (15.10), total number of pickings (9.33) and thickness of inger (1.54 cm). Treatment combinations of (GA3 75 and NAA 50 ppm) increased average weight of inger (16.28 g) and yield per plant (0.232 g). Maximum length of inger (15.82 cm) was found treatment combinations of (GA3 and NAA 50 ppm each).

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Title: Effect of Integrated Pest Management Practices in Brinjal (Solanum melongena L)

By: Sandeep Kumar, SomendraNath and S K Kannaujia

  • Abstract

    For the management of insect pests and diseases of brinjal, farmers are using conventional as well as novel pesticides including carbendazim, cypermethrin 25 EC, spinosad 2.5 percent SC and indoxacarb 15.8 SC. The large scale use of pesticides has caused many environmental problems like pesticide poisoning, insecticide resistance, resurgence of insect pests, effect of non-target organisms and pesticide residue which led to the scientist on alternative methods of pest control in brinjal. The objectives of the study were to minimize the use of chemical pesticides and establish the use of eco-friendly management practices. For this front line demonstrations were organized during 2011-12 and 2012-13 to evaluate the feasibility and economic viability of recommended practices for the management of pests (insects and diseases) of brinjal under real farm condition. On the basis of result obtained from assessment of recommended technology, frontline demonstrations were organized to disseminate the recommended practices. Components of IPM technology used were Seedling root treatment for 3 hour with imidacloprid (1ml/litre) + Soil application of Trichoderma + installation of pheromone traps @ 35/ha + Mechanical removal of infected shoots and fruits + Spraying of NSKE 4 per cent. The recommended technology was found to offer an alternative to pesticides and was feasible, economically viable, environmentally safe and effective for pest management in brinjal.

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Title: Effect of Pre-Harvest Sprays of Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Chloride and Ethephon on Fruit Quality of Grapes (Vitis vinifera L.)

By: Niraj Kumar, N K Arora, Gagandeep Kaur, M I S Gill and J S Brar

  • Abstract

    The present investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of pre-harvest sprays of ascorbic acid, calcium chloride and ethephon on hastening maturity and fruit quality of Flame Seedless grapes. The
    pre-harvest sprays of ascorbic acid (750, 1000 and 1250 ppm) and calcium chloride (0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 %) were given at fruit-set and veraison stage. Ethephon @ 400ppm was sprayed at veraison stage on
    vines with 75 per cent crop load. The treatment combination of lower bud thinning + gibberellic acid  (GA3) 40 ppm was also included for comparison along with water sprays as control. Each treatment was replicated thrice, in which one vine served as a unit treatment. The time of ripening was advanced by 5 d in the treatment 75 per cent crop load + ethephon 400ppm as compared to control, while in the treatment lower bud thinning + GA3 ripening was advance by 3 d. The same treatment i.e. lower bud thinning + GA3 resulted in signiicantly higher yield (33.54 kg/vine), maximum bunch weight, bunch length and bunch breadth. However, the fruit quality with respect to higher total soluble solids (TSS), lower acidity, higher sugars and anthocyanin content was better in 75 per cent crop load + Ethephon 400 ppm. Also the yield in treatment was at par with lower bud thinning + GA3. Thus, considering yield as well as quality parameters, the treatment 75 per cent crop load+ 400ppm Ethephon was found to be the best. Key words: Ascorbic acid, Calcium chloride, Ethephon, Flame Seedless, Gibberellic acid.

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Title: Effect of Row Spacing and Level of NPK on Growth and Yield of Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

By: Prakash Waskela, I S Naruka and R P S Shaktawat

  • Abstract

    An experiment was conducted at the Horticulture Research Farm, College of Horticulture, Mandsaur during the rabi season of 2013-2014 to study the effect of row spacing and NPK levels on the growth
    and yield of fennel. The experiment consisted of 3 levels of row spacing (30 cm, 45 cm and 60 cm) and 4 levels of NPK (0+0+0, 30+20+20, 60+40+40 and 120+60+60 kg/ha) and were evaluated under
    split plot design with four replications. Among various levels of row spacing tried, 45 cm row spacing exhibited signiicant higher growth and yield attributes and recorded signiicant higher seed yield (11.06 q/ ha) as compared to 30 cm row spacing. Among the various NPK levels tried, 60+40+40 kg ha-1exhibited signiicant maximum growth, yield attributes, yield and quality of fennel. Further treatment observed signiicant higher seed yield 12.29 q/ha with B: C ratio of 3.45 in comparison to lower NPK levels.

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Title: Eficacy of Urea Molasses Minerals Block on Milk Production and Reproductive Performance of Zebu Cattle under Field Condition

By: Pankaj Lawania and B S Khadda

  • Abstract

    An on farm trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of UMMB on performance of zebu cattle and feed economics under semi arid conditions, during the year 2016-17. Twenty lactating cows in mid lactation with similar age, body weight and breed were selected from dairy farms of the local farmers and divided into two equal groups of ten animals in each group i.e. T1 (control) and T2 (UMMB supplementation).  The feeding of animals in control group (T1) consisted of 7 kg dry maize stover with some quantity of local dry grasses and 10 kg green fodder i.e. Lucerne with concentrate mixture @40 per cent of milk yield /day. In the treatment group (T2) in addition to the above, a regular supply of urea molasses minerals  block as a lick was offered during the whole period of study, without interruption. The average milk yield was recorded 4.70± 0.20 and 6.00± 0.21l/day in control and UMMB groups, respectively. The significant increase in the milk yield by 27.65 per cent in experiment group suggested that the supplementation of UMMB improved the milk yield. Reduction in cost of milk production/ l was recorded 12.12 per cent in zebu cows supplemented with UMMB. The postpartum estrus period and service period reduced in  experimental group than the control group. It can be concluded that the feeding of UMMB improved the feed eficiency, milk production and reproductive performance of zebu cattle under semi-arid ecosystem.

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Title: Evaluation of Bullock Drawn Drum Seeder with other Rice Establishment Methods under Wet Land Conditions

By: S K Swain , A K Mohapatra, A K Dash, R K Paikray , S Jena and B R Nayak

  • Abstract

    A bullock drawn 8 row drum seeder has been developed by incorporating suitable modifications in the manual 8 row drum seeder to improve plant population stand under wet land rice cultivation system. The performance of the developed bullock drawn drum seeder was compared with the existing manual drum seeder and four other methods of rice establishment i.e. manual three row mechanical transplanter, line transplanting using rope and guide; often considered as Researcher’s method, SRI method and manual random transplanting as control. The performance of bullock drawn drum seeder was found superior to other methods of paddy establishment with respect to labour requirement, cost of operation, plant growth  and yield parameters. The highest B: C ratio of 2.26 was found out in case of bullock drawn drum seeder with cost of operation being Rs 1275/- per ha. Among the six methods of paddy establishment under wet land condition, highest grain and straw yield of 51.8 q/ha and 67.3q/ha, respectively were recorded in case of the developed bullock drawn drum seeder. The small and marginal farmers of thestate would be substantially beneited by using the bullock drawn drum seeder considering the lower  cost of cultivation, labour and drudgery involvement; yet obtaining higher grain and straw yield.

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Title: Growth and Yield of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L) as Affected by Date of Sowing and Spacing under north Gujarat Condition

By: B R Morwal and M C Patel

  • Abstract

    A ield experiment was carried out during kharif season of 2010- 11 at Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar to study the effect of sowing dates and spacing on growth and yield of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) var. Parbhani Kranti. The experiment was laid out in split plot design with three replications and sixteen treatment combinations consisted of four dates of sowing viz., 15th August (D1), 1st September (D2), 15th September (D3) and 1st October (D4) and four plant spacing 30 cm X 30 cm (S1), 45 cm X 30 cm (S2), 45 cm X 45 cm (S3) and 60 cm X 30 cm (S4). The growth and yield attributes like plant height (cm), stem girth, leaf area index, average length of internodes, lower parameters, number of fruits per plant and fruit yield per hectare were significantly higher under sowing on 15th August with plant spacing 30 cm X 30 cm (S1) but fruit yield per plant was signiicantly higher on 15th August at 45 cm x 45 cm.

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Title: Impact Analysis of Trainings and Front Line Demonstrations in Black Gram (Vigna mungo) Cultivation

By: M Ganga Devi1, Ch. Anil Kumar and D Srinivas Kumar

  • Abstract

    The impact assessment with reference to increase in knowledge levels of farmers regarding scientific package of practices, extent of adoption of selected technology and percent adoption of production technology was carried out in four adopted villages. The data about knowledge level of scientific package of practices of blackgram indicated that low, medium, and high level of knowledge after intervention of Krishi Vigyan Kendra was found to be 7, 51 and 42 per cent, respectively. Highest knowledge regarding selected scientific innovations was found for irrigation management (63 %), weed management (57 %), integrated nutrient management (54 %) integrated pest management (35 %) and pest, disease control (30 %), respectively. The technology index indicated there was feasibility of evolving technologies at the farmer’s ield.

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Title: Improving Growth, Yield and Proitability in Apple through Mulching in Rainfed Condition in Hilly Region of Uttarakhand

By: Pankaj Nautiyal, V K Sachan, Gaurav Papnai, R K Tiwari and Manisha

  • Abstract

    Apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) has become pride of hill farmers for appreciably improving their economy. In rain fed area of hilly regions, where the orchards are mainly established on medium to steep
    slopes, make the plants prone to water stress as well as nutrient loss from the soil. In spite of no assured irrigation in the hills, the moisture conservation techniques are not in practice. Under such condition, mulching may be practiced during crop cultivation which can be a substitute of irrigation to minimize moisture and nutrient loss as well as cost of production. Considering the above factors, on farm trials were conducted at Harshil area of Uttarkashi district of Uttarakhand at 2530 ft above mean sea level during the year 2010-11 and 2011-12. The trial consisted of four treatments viz., T1, mulching with black polythene, T2, mulching with dry grasses, T3, mulching with straw and T4, clean cultivation as control. Total four treatments were replicated five times. The maximum annual growth was observed under black polythene mulch, while minimum was found under clean cultivation. The highest fruit yield was recorded in mulching with black polythene followed by mulching with dry grasses, however, lowest fruit yield was observed under clean cultivation during both the years. It can be concluded that the plastic mulch has been found deficient for enhancing growth, productivity and profitability of apple crop under rain fed condition.

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Title: Inheritance of Some Quantitative Characters in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) under Normal and Saline Sodic Soils

By: Abhay Deep Gautam , S R Vishwakarma and Somendra Nath

  • Abstract

    Six populations viz., P1, P2, F1, F2, B1 and B2 of four crosses involving eight parents were evaluated following compact family block design during kharif season in 2008 to 2011 to study the mode of inheritance by using simple (A, B, C and D) and joint scaling tests. The nature and magnitude of gene effects for yield and its components in Barley was also studied using six parameters model of generation mean analysis. The presence of epistasis was detected in 64 cases by simple as well as joint sealing test and inadequacy of additive-dominance model was established. Additive (d), dominance (h) gene effects along with one or more type of non-allelic interaction (i, j, l) contributed significantly towards the inheritance of all the quantitative characters in majority of the crosses. Duplicate type of epistasis was also prevalent in most of the cases with few exceptions. Thus, biparental mating may be suggested for improvement of Barley populations

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Title: Innovations Developed by Farmers in Erode District of Tamil Nadu

By: S Saravanakumar and P Alagesan

  • Abstract

    The study was conducted in Erode district of Tamil Nadu in order to identify the grass root level farmer led innovations by using personal interview method and observations in order to know location specificity of the innovations. A total of nine innovations were selected for this study namely land preparation, cultivation aspects, harvesting technology and varietal development in acid lime, organic liquid manure preparation and pest management. All the innovators were personally interviewed to know the uniqueness and its special features. This study revealed that, two innovations on land preparation machineries having the potential of covering 2 ha in a day, other two innovations in relation to cultivation aspects reduced the cultivation cost on an average of Rs. 2,800/- and Rs. 5,000/- per ha. Two more innovations on harvesting technology were used for timely harvesting and saved Rs.6,250/- and Rs.18,750/-ha. The average yield potential of acid lime variety was up to  2000 fruits /tree / season. By adopting liquid manure preparation technique and pest management technique, a farmer saved Rs. 12,000/- and Rs. 2,500/- against the purchase of fertilizers and pesticides, respectively

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Title: Management Practices Followed by Dairy Farmers in Rural and Urban Areas of Bathinda District in Punjab

By: A P S Dhaliwal and Gurmeet Singh Dhillon

  • Abstract

    A field study was concluded to note down the various animal husbandry practices followed by the dairy farmers in rural and urban areas in Bathinda district of Punjab. It was found that about 75 per cent of respondents kept the animals in commercial type of housing system whereas 69 per cent animal sheds were nearby to the dwelling of the farmers and 83 per cent of the farmers provided concrete manger. Majority of the respondents (58%) followed the individual feeding system, cultivated fodder crops (68%) for feeding to dairy animals throughout the year and only 25 per cent of farmers produce non-legume fodder. Similarly,  while use of mixed fodder (both legume and non-legume) restricted to only 15 per cent. The health status  was maintained by using regular vaccination (91%), veterinary facilities (81%) and artificial insemination (65%) by the respondents. Majority of respondents in the study area felt the constraints of lack of capital, high cost of shed construction, high feed costs and occurrence of repeat breeding in cross bred cattle.

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Title: Manifestation of Heterosis in Indian Mustard: Through Physiological characters for Seed Yield

By: Baldeep Singh, N.K. Thakral and Geeta D Boken

  • Abstract

    Half diallel F1 crosses and parents of Indian mustard [B. juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.] genotypes were evaluated for canopy temp. (0C) at 40 DAS, 50 DAS, 60 DAS, 70 DAS and chlorophyll luorescence at 40 DAS, 50 DAS, 60 DAS, 70 DAS, seedling mortality (%) and seed yield per plant (g). Mean squares due to parent v/s crosses were signiicant for all the traits, except for canopy temperature at 50 DAS, chlorophyll luorescence (Fv/Fm) at 40 DAS, chlorophyll luorescence (Fv/Fm) at 50 DAS and chlorophyll luorescence (Fv/Fm) at 60 DAS in timely sown condition and canopy temperature at 50 DAS and canopy temperature at 70 DAS in late sown condition. For seed yield and physiological traits, crosses RH8814 x RH0555A, RH0644 x BPR543-3 and BPR349-9 x RH0644 in timely sown condition and crosses RH0555A x RH0644, RH0735 x RH0116 and BPR349-9 x RH0644 in late sown were identiied as promising on the basis of their high per se performance  with positive and negative heterotic effects. From the component character analysis, it was concluded that characters canopy temperature , chlorophyll luorescence (Fv/Fm) and seedling mortality contributed significantly towards heterosis in seed yield. These crosses could be further used to select superior segregants.

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Title: Nutrient Management in Wheat through Front Line Demonstrations in Hingoli District

By: R T Bhowate and A P Olambe

  • Abstract

    The FLD’s of wheat were conducted during the rabi season at twelve farmers’ field to demonstrate production potential and economic beneit of recommended technologies consisting of recommended
    nutrient management (100:50:50:20 NPKS kg/ha + Azotobacter + PSB @ 25 g/kg seed) over existing farmers practices of (local check 64:46:30:00 NPKS kg ha-1) at Hingoli district of Maharashtra during
    rabi season 2011-2012 and 2014-2015. Each front line demonstration was laid out on 0.40 ha area with farmers practices were considered as existing farmer practice for comparison. Recommended nutrient management technologies recorded mean yield of 25.12q/ha which was 21.33 per cent higher than that obtained with farmer’s practice. The average technology gap and index were found to be 4.38 q/ha and 16.25 per cent. Improved soil fertility status at the time of harvest in demonstration plot as compared to farmer practice (local check) will save the fertilizer doses due to its judicious use of fertilizers.

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Title: Performance of Different Genotypes of Chilli (Capsicum annum) under Allahabad Agro-Climatic Condition

By: T S Mishra*, N K Mishra, A K Singh N D Singh and A N Tripathi

  • Abstract

    The investigation was carried out at the Vegetable Research Farm in the Department of Horticulture, Allahabad Agricultural Institute-Deemed University, Allahabad to evaluate the performance of
    20 genotypes under Allahabad agro-climatic conditions. All twenty genotypes were tested in a randomized block design with 3 replications. The observations were recorded on 14 quantitative
    traits and 3 qualitative traits i.e. plant height at 100 d, 120 d, days to 1st lowering, days to 50 per cent lowering, days to 1stgreen fruit harvest, average fruit length, average fruit diameter, average
    green fruit yield/plant, days to1st red ripe fruit harvest, average weight of red ripe fruit yield, number of seeds/fruit, weight of seeds/ fruit, ascorbic acids, oleoresin (%) and capsaicin content (%).
    The earliest day to 1st lowering amongst genotypes was recorded with the Pusa Jawala (31.66) followed by LCA 301 (32), JCA 9(32.33) and the maximum days to 1st lowering were noticed in LCA 333 (41.66). Days to 50 per cent lowering was also observed significant among genotypes.The minimum days to first green fruit harvest was recorded in LCA 357 (79.00) followed by LCA 404 (80.66) and Pusa Jawala (81.33) while genotype LCA 301 (96.33) took maximum days to irst green fruit harvest. There were significant differences among genotypes for capsaicin (%) content. The maximum capsaicin (%) was found in IC 413702 (0.62%) followed by Pbc 1438 (0.51%) and IC-383079(0.47%), while JCA 9(0.16%) was found with minimum capsaicin.

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Title: Performance of Mechanical Reaper for Ragi (Eleusine coracana L.) Harvesting

By: Syed Mazaril, Kamalabai and Ranganatha S C

  • Abstract

    A study on Front line demonstration of power tiller mounted mechanical reaper was conducted at farmers’field in Magadi taluk of Ramanagar district by Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK), Ramanagara. Demonstrations were carried out at 25 farmers field covering an area of 11 há during kharif 2013-14 and 2014-15 seasons. The Results of the study showed that harvesting of ragi using reaper had reduced time of operation by 72 per cent, total labour dependency by 92 per cent and cost of cultivation by 81 per cent as compared to manual operation. Field capacity of ragi reaper was found to be 0.23 ha/hr in comparison to manual operation. This demonstration helped the farmers in creating awareness and inculcating the knowledge of the mechanization, which in turn help them to get more returns. Farmer opined that mechanical reaper was easy to operate, can reduce drudgery and overcomes labour scarcity during crucial stage of operation.

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Title: Popularization of Horse Gram (Macrotyloma unilorum) in Vellore District of Tamil Nadu

By: Noorjehan A K A Hanif, R Ramasamy, S Joshua Davidson and M Pandiyan

  • Abstract

    Horse Gram, Macrotyloma unilorum (Fabaceae) although rich in proteins (20 %) but due to less acceptable taste and lavour of cooked products, it is consumed only by the farming community and low-income groups. In Tamil Nadu, total area cultivated under horse gram crop is 48,000 ha and covering an area of 8,000 ha in Vellore district. It is mostly grown under rainfed conditions during the month of October after the receipt of north east monsoon. In order to introduce new potential horse gram varieties, on farm trials were conducted through Krishi Vigyan Kendra during 2014-15. It was found that 32.35 per cent higher yield was obtained in the recommended variety CRIDA 18R over the local variety with higher BCR of 2.4. In the succeeding year 2015-16, front line demonstrations were conducted and found that variety CRIDA 18R of horse gram gave higher grain yield over the local variety Paiyur 2, with a net return of 29.7 per cent higher than the local variety. Thus, the study clearly revealed that the variety CRIDA 18R has more potential than the local variety under rainfed conditions of Vellore district.

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Title: Problems of Lac Growers in Chhatishgarh

By: Anup Prakash Upadhyay and Gaurav Papnai

  • Abstract

    This study has been undertaken to identify the nature of problems faced by the Lac growers with objectives to identify the socio-economic and psychological proile along with the problems of lac growers in the district and provide suggestions for improving income through lac cultivation. The Kanker district was selected purposively due to maximum area coverage. Total 60 lac growers from four villages of two blocks were randomly selected. The study shows the awareness among farmers as they do plantation of short-cycled host plants of Semialata rather than Kusum tress. The understanding of farmers is quite high about diseases, pest control, pruning, and other farming practices. Absence of organized market, Price luctuation, Lack of training in harvesting, handling and processing of Lac was found to be major challenge for the farmers. Climatic changes and broodlac availability was reported as other issues. Organized effort from the government line departments, KVKs and forest department for capacity building of farmers are urgent requirements.

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Title: Production Technologies of Red Gram ( Cajanus cajan L) Adopted by Farmers of Karimnagar District of Telangana

By: N Venkateshwar Rao1, P K Jain, MJagan Mohan Reddy and N Kishor Kumar

  • Abstract

    In order to study the adoption of production technologies of red gram by the KVKs adopted versus non-adopted farmers, a questionnaire was developed consisting of 21 technologies measured on 3 point continuum i.e. fully adopted, partially adopted and non adopted with the scores of 3,2,1, respectively. It was observed that, majority (40.0%) of the KVK adopted red gram farmers had medium extent of adoption followed by high (36.67%) and low (23.33%) whereas, majority (43.33%) of the KVK non-adopted farmers had medium extent of adoption followed by low (40.00%) and high (16.67%). Further, calculated ‘Z’ Value (2.25) was greater than table ‘Z’ value at 0.01 level of probability. Therefore, the null hypothesis was rejected and hence it could be concluded that there exists a significant difference between mean scores of KVK adopted and non adopted farmers.

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Title: Productive and Reproductive Performance of Vanaraja Birds Reared by Tribal Community of Dhemaji District of Assam

By: Ashim Kr. Saikia, G Gogoi and M Neog

  • Abstract

    Productive and reproductive performances in terms of body weight, age at first egg, egg production, egg eight, fertility, hatchability and mortality of Vanaraja and Desi chicken of Assam were studied under
    traditional system of rearing and their respective values were compared between two varieties. The Vanaraja birds were given to rear under the demonstration programme of the Dhemaji KVK to the farmers of tribal communities like Bodo, Mising and Sonowal tribes of the district. The overall mean body weight was signiicantly (P?0.05) higher in Vanaraja than Desi chicken. The mean age at irst egg was recorded as 181.05±1.52 in Vanaraja and in Desi chicken it was 203.31±3.13 d which was signiicantly (P?0.05) different. The mean egg production up to 32, 40, 52 and 72 wk of age in Vanaraja were recorded as 32.13±0.11, 50.08±0.32 89.29±1.02 and 181.12±1.53 numbers, respectively and in case of Desi chicken, the corresponding values were recorded as 11.21±0.03, 25.82±0.18, 42.57±0.72 and 76.27±0.85, respectively.  The mean egg weight of Vanaraja at 32, 40 and 52 wk of age was also signiicantly (P?0.05) higher than Desi birds. However, there was no signiicant difference in mortality rates between two groups during 6 to 30 and 31 to 52 wk of age. There was also no signiicant (P?0.05) difference in fertility and hatchability percent between two genetic groups. Therefore, it may be concluded that Vanaraja birds were adapted well  under traditional backyard rearing system among the tribal communities in Dhemaji district of Assam.

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Title: Ready-to-Serve Beverage from Spray Dried Pomegranate Juice Powder

By: S D Shelar, V P Kad, V L Kanawade A P Patil and P A Unde

  • Abstract

    The pomegranate juice is considered as the one of the nature’s most powerful antioxidants. Excellent flavour, nutritive value and medicinal properties of pomegranate fruit indicates its good potentiality for processing into value added products. In India and other countries of the world the demand of fruit beverages are increasing regularly due to its nutritional, medicinal and calorific properties. Present investigation was undertaken to develop RTS beverage using spray dried pomegranate juice powder with added sugar and citric acid. Spray dried powder of pomegranate (Cv. Bhagwa) juice obtained with 154°C inlet air temperature, 87.5 mL/h feed low rate and 37 per cent malto dextrine concentration were used to prepare the RTS premix. For standardization, pomegranate RTS was prepared with various levels of powder quantities (6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 g powder per 100 mL RTS), TSS (12, 13, 14, 15 and 16°Brix) and acidity (control, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30 and 0.35 %). The results of sensory score indicated that the RTS developed using 8 g spray dried pomegranate juice powder per 100 mL RTS having 15°Brix total soluble solids and 0.30 per cent acidity was found to be best among all the levels.

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Title: Role of Cluster Frontline Demonstrations in Enhancement of Chickpea Production

By: Rupesh Khedkar, Vijay Shinde and Pawan Chaudhari

  • Abstract

    The cluster frontline demonstration (CFLDs) on chickpea was conducted by Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Malegaon in two villages namely Vadel and Ajang of Malegaon tehsil during the rabi season of 2015-
    16. The results revealed that improved seed of Digvijay + seed treatment (Trichoderma viridi 5 g/kg + Rhizobium sp. 25 g/kg + PSB 25 g/kg) + plant protection (Pheromone trap 3 no./acre+ insecticide)
    recorded average highest yield 21.16 q/ha followed by 16.25 q/ha in control plot. The same trend was found in case of gross and net monetary returns, which was Rs. 84636/- and Rs. 51545/-ha and for control Rs. 64992/- and Rs. 28392/-ha, respectively. Beneit cost ratio for demonstration and control was 2.56 and 1.78, respectively. It can be concluded that the pulses production could be enhanced by encouraging the farmers through adoption of recommended technologies which were followed in the CFLDs.

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Title: Socio-economic Characteristics and Constraints Faced by Horticultural Growers of East Sikkim

By: Pallabi Phukan, Boniface Lepcha, Ravikant Avasthe and N J Singh

  • Abstract

    Farmers in Sikkim have an aversion to commercial production of horticultural crops as this requires high initial investment. Low educational level coupled with improper technical training/extension services leading to low adoption of new technologies has been a problem area. Farmer’s perception in case of seasonal training revealed that about 39.3 percent farmers preferred 2-3 days training followed by 5-7 days training (22%), one day training (18%), less than 7 days training (12.7%) and no training (8%). Regarding demonstrations, 65.3 per cent of the respondents preferred off campus while 4.7 per cent preferred on campus demonstrations. The study revealed twenty six major constraints and difficulty in using bio control agents, non-availability of bio pesticides and bio-fertilizers were most predominant among all for horticulture growers of East Sikkim.

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Title: Socio-economic Characterisation and Dairy Production System Maintained by Women Milk Producer Cooperative Societies in Indian Sundarban Region

By: Sima Das, Sarbaswarup Ghosh, Rupak Goswami and N C Sahu

  • Abstract

    The present study was undertaken to characterise socio economic pattern of WMPCS members and analyse small holder dairy production system including its constraints in the Indian Sundarban. A total of 160 respondents from six development blocks were interviewed with a pre tested questionnaire. 74.4 per cent of the farmers had age between 20-45 yr and 88 per cent of them were married, which reflects young and energetic attitude of the farmers. 46.9 per cent of the farmers had only primary level of education.63.5 per cent of the WMPCS members belonged to low income group (Rs 2500/- – 5000/-), evidently, net income from sale of milk by WMPCS members was found to be signiicantly higher (p<0.05) than that of informal dairy farmers. Herd size per household varied between 1.46 to 1.87 total livestock units (TLU); non-descript Indian zebu was the pre-dominant breed. 37.6 per cent respondents used artificial technique for breeding purpose.  FEAST computer program was used to analyse feed resources of the area and it was found that the small holder dairy production system entirely depend upon grazing with little supplementation of concentrates. In the lean months of winters, residues of leguminous crops as well as mangrove leaves were used as fodders. Milk production of different cattle breeds varied significantly (P<0.01) and milk yield from cross-bred Jersey
    was maximum (1652 l/lactation). Principal constraint was lack of green fodder production for dairy farming.

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Title: Socio-economic Impact of Livestock in Tribal Areas of Leh

By: Shahid Ahmad Shergojry, Zubair Ahmad Akhoon, Tasneem Mubarak and Dorjay Namgyal

  • Abstract

    Livestock is not only an important source of food and income but also the sign of assets in rural areas for poor people. In order to estimate how social-economic factors influence livestock production and income with the help of empirical model, the authors used the data collected from 100 household selected from 24 villages of 6 localities in Leh region of Jammu and Kashmir. In Ladakh region overall 70 per cent people are dependent on livestock especially in areas of Zanskar and Nyoma, out of which about 80 per cent are women. Hence, it is strongly suggested that stakeholders should look forward to the livestock production system in Leh region of Jammu and Kashmir to have clear strategy and good policies.

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Title: Socio-Personal, Communication Characteristics and Information Needs of Vegetable Growers of Hill Region of Uttarakhand

By: Gaurav Papnai , Neelam Bhardwaj, S K Kashyap and Shweta Sunetha

  • Abstract

    The study was conducted to identify the relationship between socio-personal & communication characteristics and information needs for designing distance learning modules for farmers of hill districts
    of Uttarakhand. One hundred and twenty vegetable growers of four hill districts of Uttarakhand state comprising of Kumaon and Garhwal region were selected for the study. Data were analyzed by using
    percentage, frequency and chi-square analysis. It was observed that vegetable growers of hill regions of Uttarakhand had moderate to high need for information as well as knowledge. The most important areas in which respondents had high information needs were seed treatment, weed management, disease and pest control, chemical fertilizer application, harvesting, post harvesting and marketing. The findings revealed there were no direct meaningful relationship between information needs and Socio-personal profiles.

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Title: Soil Fertility Status as Inluenced by Cropping System in Submountain Zone of Lower Shiwalik Hills in Punjab

By: Harinder Singh and Jagdish Singh

  • Abstract

    The present study was conducted to access the effect of cropping system under irrigated and rainfed condition on fertility status of the soil. The soil samples (0-15 cm) were collected from four villages,
    i.e Jhandiankalan, Mehndrikhurd, Samlah and fatehgarhviran. The results from chemical analysis of samples revealed that the pH of 100% samples from was lied between 6.5-8.7 and EC from 100% samples lied below 0.8 dS/m. Soil samples in irrigated system were high in SOC category, whereas none of the soil sample in rainfed system had SOC in this category. Similarly, available P, K and DTPA extractable available Cu, Zn and Fe were low in soils from maize-wheat system as compared to rice-wheat system soils

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Title: Technological Gain in Sugarcane Cultivation through Contract Farming in Odisha

By: Santosh Kumar Samantaray

  • Abstract

    Contract farming, an agreement between farmers and processing firms for the production and supply of  agricultural products under forward agreements, at predetermined prices. It also transfer technological knowledge and skills in a way that is proitable for both the contracting firms and contracted grows. This study was conducted in Dhenkanal and Nayagarh district of Odisha with a sample size of 90 contract sugarcane growers selected randomly from each selected districts aggregating 180 samples for the purpose of investigation. The study revealed that the contract sugarcane growers had deficiency on disease, pest and nutrient management. Low level of adoption was observed on use of implements, application of recommended dose of fertilizers, use of herbicides and management of ratoon crops. Socio-economic attributes such as education, social participation, extension contact, cosmopolitans, land holding had positive influence in increasing the knowledge level of the respondents. It was therefore, suggested that the contracting sugar industries should organize capacity building programmes to enrich the knowledge and adoption level of  the sugarcane growers for quality production beneiting both the contracted farmers and contracting irms.

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Title: Tissue Culture Protocol for In-vitro Propagation of Papaya (Carica papaya L.)

By: Bindu B and Bindu Podikunju

  • Abstract

     Papaya is slowly emerging from the status of a homestead crop to that of commercial crop due to increasing awareness of multifold uses of papaya. Its cultivation is encountered with the problem of its dioecious nature. Micro propagation represents the only economic way of continuously producing uniform planting material of known sex. The studies on in- vitro propagation of papaya (Carica papaya L.) was carried out at the Department of Pomology and Floriculture, College of Agriculture, Vellayani. The propagation studies were carried out by enhanced release of axillary buds in Papaya variety Pusa Nanha. Apical buds and lateral buds from seedlings and mature plants were used as explant. Explants were subjected to different treatments of plant growth substances for culture establishment and shoot proliferation. The study revealed that full strength MS medium supplemented with sucrose 30.0 g/l and agar 6.5 g/l under light condition produced highest shoot number and longest shoot in papaya. Application of BA 0.50 mg/l along with NAA 0.1mg/l was found to be better for initial culture establishment and proliferation. Application of amino acid, glycine, 100.00 mg/l resulted in highest shoot proliferation rate, while highest shoot length was obtained from arginine100.0 mg/l. Addition of activated charcoal 0.05 per cent and Cobalt chloride 5.0 mg/l increased the shoot proliferation rate and shoot length in papaya. In vitro rooting was more in full strength MS medium supplemented with IBA 3.0 mg/l, sucrose 30.0 g/l and activated charcoal 0.05 per cent.

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Title: Use of Soil Test Crop Response Approach in Direct Seeded Rice

By: Vidyavathi G Yadahalli and M R Kammar

  • Abstract

    To assess the soil test crop response (STCR) based nutrient management in direct seeded rice (DSR), demonstrations were conducted at ive farmer’s ield during kharif 2015-16 in Tunga Bhadra Command area of Raichur, India. Three technology options (TO) were assessed and were TO1: Farmers’ practice (Imbalanced fertilization (250:155:133 kg/ha), TO2: Recommeded package of practices (100:50:50 kg/ha) and TO3: STCR equation based application of fertilizers (targeted yield: 75 q/ha). The grain and straw yield of DSR (variety BPT 5204) was found higher in TO3 (70.70 and 79.94 q/ha, respectively) and increase was to the tune of 21.5 and 21.4 per cent over TO2. The higher B:C ratio was recorded in the TO3 (2.97) and was higher by  14.67 per cent over TO1 (2.59). After harvest of crop, it was observed that there was build up of available N, P2O5 and K2O in plots with TO3 in all the ive farmers ield. These results clearly indicated that application of fertilizers to crops based on soil test values and target yield approach was effective in getting the higher yield.

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Title: Varietal Performance of Turmeric (Curcuma Longa L.) in Chamarajanagar District of Karnataka

By: Mohan Kumar A B, Yogesh G S, Navi S S , Naresh N T and Chandrakala Hanagi

  • Abstract

    A field experiment was conducted during 2012-13 and 2013-14 to evaluate and identify superior and most promising variety of Turmeric suitable for Chamarajanagar district. Five varieties of turmeric viz.,
    Chaitanya, IISR Prabha, IISR Pratibha, IISR Allepy supreme and Chamarajanagar local varieties were evaluated. Average data of two years revealed that the variety IISR Pratibha recorded highest fresh (345.43 q/ha) and cured rhizome (70.36 q/ha) yield followed by IISR Allepy supreme and IISR Prabha, while in curing percentage IISR Allepy supreme (22.3%) was found to be superior followed by IISR Prabha and IISR Pratibha. With regard to rhizome numbers and their length, IISR Pratibha produced more number of rhizome (10.75), maximum length (10.12 cm) and girth (2.13 cm) followed by IISR Allepy supreme. The varieties IISR Prabha, IISR Pratibha and IISR Allepy supreme were found to be early duration types (230.75 to 234.50 d) compared to Chaitanya and Chamarajanagar local, which matured relatively late (265.13 to 269.81 d). IISR Pratibha recorded signiicantly highest per day productivity (149.11 kg/day) followed by IISR Allepy supreme (134.12 kg/day). With respect to curcumin content, IISR Allepy supreme recorded highest (5.73%) followed by IISR Pratibha (5.20%).Over and all, IISR Pratibha and IISR Allepy supreme excelled

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Title: Yield Realization of Different Brassica Cultivars under Central Plain Zone of Punjab

By: Jatinder Manan and Manoj Sharma

  • Abstract

    The experiment was laid out using randomized block design with 8 treatments and 3 replications during rabi 2016-17. Treatments comprised of 8 cultivars of Brassica sown at the KVK Kapurthala farm in
    order to evaluate the yield potential of these cultivars under central plain zone of Punjab conditions. The crop was sown on 10th November 2016 and harvested during 1st fortnight of April 2017. The
    study revealed that minimum duration was taken by YSH 0401 (141.0 d) and maximum by RH 749 (154.9 d). The data also showed that there was no signiicant difference in seed yield levels between 4
    cultivars (RH 406, NRCDR 2 and NRCHB 101 and GSC 7), whereas, these were signiicantly higher yielder than other cultivars. Productivity on per day basis was calculated and found that maximum
    productivity was observed in NRCHB 101 (15.5 kg/ha/d) and lowest in YSH 0401 (9.1 kg/ha/d).

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Title: Effect of Demonstration on Use of Paddy Straw Baler in Raichur District

By: Mouneshwari R Kammar, Vidyavathi G Yand Amaresh Y S

Title: Evaluation of Alternate Rice Variety for Replacement of BPT 5204 Suitable for Samba Season in Southern Zone of Tamil Nadu

By: M Kathiravan and C Vanitha

Title: Evaluation of Ridge Gourd (Luffa acutangula (Roxb) L.) Genotypes for Higher Yield

By: Krishnamoorthy V and Ananthan M

Title: Prevalence of Mastitis in Goats

By: Vandna Bhanot, O P Mehla, Kamaldeep and Rajnish Kumar

Title: Technological Intervention for Improving the Breeding and Production Performance of Desi Pigs

By: P Kumaravel and G Senthilkumar

Whats New

 First National Conference will be organized at CIFA, Bhubneswar

on 5th to 7th January,2018.

Kindly prepare full papers, abstracts and ppt.

 

 

For applying Young Scientist and Krishi Vigyan Fellow Awards , 

kindly send your brief biodata at 

societykrishivigyan@gmail.com before 15th December,2017.

 

 

Kindly write your research paper in PAST TENSE please.

Processing of research papers .Kindly note please

Friends, research papers with statistical analysis  are accepted at stage 1 immediately and conveyed , processed further only after receiving membership fee for all authors.

At stage 2, paper is sent to the referee for comments .

At stage 3 paper is sent to the authors for revision as per comments of the referee.

At stage 4,paper is accepted for publishing.

At stage 5, pdf copy of the proof is sent for errors , if any.

At stage 6, paper is published and put on website. 

 

 

Friends, it is very shocking that before uploading a research paper on website, authors do not bother to read previous issues of Journal of Krishi Vigyan put on the website www.iskv.in.

They submit the paper online ,written for some other journal ,because either they are not as per format, data is about 8-10 years old, references cited are incomplete, not as per journal style, even proper headings are missing like abstract, materials and methods, results and discussion . 

Such research papers are instantly rejected.

May I request our readers to upload a paper after satisfying thoroughly that it will definitely be accepted , because  your and institution rapport is at stake.  

 

SOCIETY HAS LAUNCHED A NEW PERIODICAL NAMELY JOURNAL FOR REVIEWS ON AGRICULTURE AND ALLIED FIELDS, WHICH WILL BE LAUNCHED IN THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE AT BHUBANESWAR.

 

 

 

PUBLISHING AND PROCESSING CHARGES @RS.350/- PAGE , IF ACCEPTED.  

PRESENT PAPERS BASED ON FLD  IN THE FIRST CONFERENCE. ALL SUCH PAPERS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN SPECIAL ISSUE OF JOURNAL OF KRISHI VIGYAN ( Conference Issue)

 

Further, The data in research papers based on front line demonstrations need to be analysed with the help of appropriate statistical tools in order to improve the quality of publication.

 

It has been noticed that authors are submitting research papers on our website online and simultaneously to other journals also. On inquiring on telephone, they say, please do not publish as it has already been published in other journal. Friends, why are you  doing so?

 

 

Henceforth, each article must be enclosed with article certificate that this paper has not been submitted elsewhere  for publishing. For any error, SOCIETY OF KRISHI VIGYAN WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE IN  THIS REGARD.

 

 

For incorporating your paper on top priority in coming issue, please send membership fee for all authors and intimate through Email to drmanojsh1@gmail.com . 

 



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