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Journal of
Krishi Vigyan

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Journal Volumes

Year: 2016, Volume: 5, Issue: 1

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Title: Assessment of Soil Fertility Status under Different Cropping Sequences in District Kapurthala

By: Gobinder Singh, Manoj Sharma, Jatinder Manan and Gurmeet Singh

  • Abstract

    The present study was undertaken to assess the fertility status of soil put under various cropping sequences followed in different villages of different blocks in the district. Seven villages namely Bhagwanpur, Bhetan, Boolpur, Kheeranwali, Khukrain, Meripur and Swal, falling under three blocks namely Dhilwan, Kapurthala and Sultanpur were selected. The soil samples were taken from 0-15 cm depth with the help of auger after the harvesting of the rabi crops during 2014-15, using the GPS locations. The pH values of soils in all the villages varied from neutral to strongly alkaline (6.79 to 9.87). The pH of all the soil samples of Bhagwanpur and Bhetan villages was neutral to slightly alkaline in nature (<8.7), however, the highest mean pH value was from village Khukrain where 31 per cent of the soil samples were found to be strongly alkaline (>9.3) followed by Kheeranwali village (15 %). The salinity hazard does not exist in village Bhagwanpur, Meripur and Bhetan, however, 42 and 36 per cent samples in village Khukrain and Boolpur showed higher salinity level, respectively. The mean value of EC in Boolpur was 0.76ds/m with a range varying from 0.3 to 1.9ds/m. It was found that organic carbon (OC) status of majority of samples ranged between low to medium. In light textured soils, 54 per cent of samples of Bhetan were found to contain low OC content whereas the soils of Boolpur were found to be rich in OC ranging from 0.32 to 1.07 per cent with mean value of 0.64 per cent and only 12 per cent of samples were under low OC category. The mean values of available phosphorus were 16.7 to 24.2 kg/ha in soil samples of all the villages. The high status of available potassium was found in Khukrain village (92%) followed by Bhagwanpur (72%), Kheeranwali (55%), Swal and Bhetan (45%) and Boolpur (44%). It was interested to note that highest available phosphorus content was found in the soil under potato based cropping sequence due to excessive phosphatic fertilizers application as compared to recommendations of research institutes. However, contrast trends were obtained in case of available potassium status because uptake of potassium was low in paddy-wheat cropping sequence as compared to vegetable and potato based cropping sequence. The OC and available phosphorus exhibited a positive correlation with cropping intensity due to application of higher inorganic fertilizers and incorporation of plant biomass as compared to paddywheat cropping sequence. On the other hand, pH, EC and available potassium showed a decreasing trend with the increased crop intensity from paddy-wheat to paddy-potato/vegetable-summer crop.

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Title: Constraints Faced by Livestock Owners in Adoption of Animal Husbandry Practices in KVK Adopted and Non-Adopted Villages in Rewa District of Madhya Pradesh

By: Deepa Singh1, Niranjan Lal2, N V Khode3 and Rekha Yadav1

  • Abstract

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the constraints faced by livestock owners in adoption of scientific animal husbandry practices in two KVK adopted and two non-adopted villages in Rewa district of Madhya Pradesh. Thirty respondents were selected randomly from each village. Thus, a total of 120 respondents who possessed at least 2 or more dairy animals were personally interviewed and data collected by using interview schedule. In KVK adopted villages poor results of artificial insemination, distant location of veterinary hospital from farmers’ house and poor availability of concentrate and mineral mixture were major constraints, whereas, in non-adopted villages, major constraints were demand for additional money along with prescribed  artificial insemination fee, distant location of veterinary hospital and lack of green fodder availability

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Title: Cost Effectiveness of Developed Accessories from Reusable Knitwear Waste

By: N Kakkar*, D Kaur **and V Gandotra**

  • Abstract

    The present investigation on cost effectiveness of developed accessories from reusable knitwear waste was carried out in Ludhiana city. An interview schedule was prepared and data were collected from 90 respondents falling in the age group of 17-27 yr through purposive random sampling technique from three colleges of Ludhiana city. The results from the first interview schedule of the study revealed that majority of the respondents were 17-22 yr of age and were higher secondary, belonged to nuclear families and had monthly family income between Rs.51,000 to Rs. 75,000/-. Seventy one per cent of the respondents were aware of accessories prepared from reusable knitwear waste. All the accessories prepared were highly appreciated on the basis of suitability of design, utility and overall impact. Majority of the respondents rated all the accessories as very good. The quoted prices of the accessories were found to be adequate and 11.0 to 81.9 per cent profit can be earned by making accessories.

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Title: Cropping Pattern in Tribal Area of Dang District

By: J B Dobariya1, N M Thesiya2, V J Zinzala3 and S A Aklade4

  • Abstract

    Study was conducted in the Dang district of Gujarat. For the purpose of this study, 20 villages of Waghai, Ahwa and Subir talukas were selected. 200 respondents were selected for the study with the help of proportionate multistage random sampling methods of analysis. 44.5 per cent of the respondents were in the middle age group, 62.5 per cent of the respondents were found to have below or primary level of education, 57.0 per cent of the respondents belonged to the marginal and small farmers, respectively. Majority (76 %) of the respondents were in the middle to low level of extension personnel contact, 78 per cent of the respondents were in the low to middle level of economic motivation, 77.5 per cent of the respondent had low to medium level of scientific orientation and 38.5 percent of farmers did not have any source of irrigation. Production of paddy (drilled), paddy (T.P), niger and gram had increased during the last five years, no major change was observed in cropping pattern in kharif crops, although, in rabi, change in cropping pattern was observed due to increase in irrigation facility and market availability. Area under paddy, black gram, soybean and niger had increased while area under ragi, sorghum, pigeon pea had decreased during last five years. Population growth and change in family structure, modernization and commercialization of agriculture, change in agricultural production, prices and food and fodder self-sufficiency were socio-economic factors responsible for to change in cropping pattern.

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Title: Development of Ready-to-Cook Instant Kheer Mix

By: Kabita C Sarma, Saurabh Sarma# and Sk Md Azizur Rahman

  • Abstract

    Kheer, also known as Payasam is one of the most famous and authentic milk based dessert in India. Kheer is prepared by the partial dehydration of whole milk usually with sugar and rice and is prepared only on auspicious and special days because of its lengthy and tedious method of preparation. For preparation of 1 kg Kheer mix  required ingredients were maida (1400g), refined oil (90 ml or 6 tbs) and water (350 ml). The instant Kheer mix was prepared by adding 6 tbs of refined oil to 1400g of refined flour (maida) and mixed properly followed by adding of 350 ml of cold water to make the dough manually. The prepared dough was shaped manually into approximately 0.8 cm long and 0.2 cm thick structures, sun dried for 2 – 3d by spreading in a thin layer over a cloth and covering with a transparent plastic sheet. The mix prepared were packed in airtight polypropylene bags and stored as ready-to-use Kheer mix. Study revealed that the innovative technologies include the preparation of base material from refined flour and oil and is preservative free and does not require soaking for long time. It was observed that 70 per cent of the members liked extremely, 25 per cent of the members liked very much and 5 per cent of the members liked moderately

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Title: Effect of Concentrate Feeding in Lambs

By: Pankaj Lavania and Dilip Kumar

  • Abstract

    Sheep farming plays a significant role in ensuring livelihood security to the millions of small and marginal farmers. This is one of the most profitable entrepreneurial avenues among different momentum. Based on the observation and conclusion of PRA techniques, KVK scientist planned to organize front line demonstration (FLD) on feeding of concentrate supplementation on the growth performance in lambs. Ten shepherds were identified for conducting FLD. The lambs under demonstration group were provided concentrate mixture consisting of bajra 77 kg, groundnut cake 20 kg, mineral mixture 2 kg and common salt 1 kg and fed @ 1 per cent of the body weight in addition to grazing for 90d while control group lambs were maintained on sole grazing. The feeding trial was conducted for 90d during 2013-14. it was found that supplemented group of lambs achieved significantly higher (P<0.01) body weight gain than the control group. Similarly, the body weight gain (kg) and average daily gain (g) were also higher in demonstration group. It can be concluded that supplementary feeding of concentrate with grazing was beneficial in growing sheep for higher economic returns

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Title: Effect of Integrated Nutrient Management on Soil Fertility Status, Productivity and Profitability of Garden Pea

By: Mandhata Singh, Deokaran and B P Bhatt

  • Abstract

    A field experiment was conducted during rabi seasons of 2013-14 and 2014-15 to find out the effect of integrated nutrient management on productivity and profitability of garden pea. Results indicated that integration of inorganic and organic sources of nutrients was more effective in enhancing the crop growth, yield and economics of garden pea. Integration of inorganic fertilizers with different organic manures such as FYM, bio-fertilizers, poultry manures and vermin-compost produced taller plant height, more nodule number and weight, higher number of pods, pod length and pod yield as compared to sole application of inorganic fertilizers. Economic analysis of data also showed that maximum net return of Rs 76,923/- was associated with 50% NPK+ BF + FYM 5.0 + PM 1.25 + VC 1.25 t/ha and benefit cost ratio (2.69) with 50% NPK + BF + PM 1.75 t/ha. Application of organic manures was also effective in improving the soil organic carbon, available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium status. Soil pH and bulk density were also improved with the incorporation of organic manures.

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Title: Effect of Lyophilization Technology on Dried Carnation Flower

By: Metta Siresha1 Mahalakshmi V Reddy2

  • Abstract

    The study was undertaken to explore the effect of lyophilization technology on dried carnation flower. Lyophilization helped to retain the natural colour, form and texture of the dried flowers. Certain preservatives were selected, tested and evaluated to keep hold of innate characteristics of flowers. The flower treated with silver thiosulphate (STS) was found to be effective hydration treatments resulting flowers remained fresh up to 9d. Floral preservative (T8) was the best composition which retains inherent qualities of the flowers. The water content of the plant was replaced with a water immiscible organic solvent for pre treatments. Application of glazing medium as sealant was found best to protect flower from external environment conditions

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Title: Effect of Plant Spacing on Yield and Yield Attributes of Maize Hybrids

By: Jatinder Manan, Gurmeet Singh, Manoj Sharma and Gobinder Singh

  • Abstract

    The study was conducted at experimental fields of the Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Kapurthala. The experiment was laid out in a 6 strip plots with plot size of 48 m2 including 2 hybrids (PMH 1 and DKC 9125) at 3 plant population densities comprising of 55,555, 83,333 and 1,11,111 plants/ha with the objective of observing the effect of plant spacing on yield attributes and yield of maize hybrids. The yield attributing factors as number of rows per cob, number of grains per row, cob girth and cob length were determined and finally the yield was recorded for both the hybrids.  In case of DKC 9125 the only factor contributing to increase in cob yield and grain yield per unit area was the number of plants grown in the area, so the maximum yield was obtained at 15 cm plant spacing whereas, in case of PMH 1, both yield attributing factors (cob length and plant spacing) ultimately led to increase in grain yield. At 20 cm plant spacing the number of plants were reduced but increase in cob length at wider plant spacing nullified the effect of lesser plants grown per unit area. It was due to the reason that increase in cob length did not occur proportionately to the reduction in plant population. Hence, PMH 1 hybrid gave maximum cob yield and grain yield at 20 cm plant spacing.

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Title: Effect of Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent on Blood Morphology of Fresh Water Fish in Tarai Region of Uttarakhand

By: V K Misra1, M Das Trakroo2, C D Sharma3, Shashank Singh4, N D Singh1 and A N Tripathi5

  • Abstract

    The present paper deals with the toxicity of common mixed industrial effluent of Tarai Region of Uttarakhand on the blood morphology of an important fresh water fish (Cyprinus carpio var. communis).  When fish was exposed to 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 per cent effluent concentrations, various morphological changes were observed but the changes were less in the specimens treated with 3, 4 and 5per cent effluent concentration compared to 6 and 7per cent. In fish exposed to 3, 4 and 5per cent concentrations, the formation of tear drop cell, binucleated cell, microcytes, spherocytes, roulex cell, sickle cell, agglutinated cells and   rupturing of donnanens membrane in the cells were observed but in fishes exposed to 6 and 7 per cen effluent concentration the agglutination of hemoglobin, membrane degeneration and formation of elliptocyts, hemoglobin crystal, stomatocytes, ovalocytes, and inclusion bodies were found.

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Title: Effect of Row Spacing and Nitrogen on Growth and Yield of Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.)

By: Ajay Sharma, I S Naruka and R P S Shaktawat

  • Abstract

    A field experiment was conducted during rabi 2012-13 at the Research Farm, College of Horticulture, Mandsaur (Madhya Pradesh) to study the response of coriander to different row spacing and nitrogen levels. The experiment was laid out in factorial RBD design with three replications including three row spacing and four levels of nitrogen. The different treatments significantly influenced the growth, yield and quality attributes of coriander. Application of 90-120 Kg N/ha and 30 cm row spacing significantly improved plant height, number of branches/plant, fresh weight of leaves (g)/plant, dry weight of plant (g)/plant, days to 50 % flowering, number of umbels/plant, number of umbellets/plant, test weight, seed yield, straw yield, biological yield, harvest index, chlorophyll content in leaves (mg/g) and essential oil content (%) of seeds over their respective lower levels

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Title: Effect of Spacing on Yield of Tuberose at Farmers Field in Karnataka

By: Nagappa Desai and B Mamatha

  • Abstract

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of spacing on growth, flowering and spike yield in Tuberose (Polianthes tuberose L). The experiment consisted of three different plant spacing viz.,  S1- 45×30 cm, S2 – 30×30 cm and S3 – 30×15 cm with seven replications under CRBD. The result revealed that the significant effect on growth, flowering and spike yield was observed by spacing. The spacing of 30 x 30cm were found to be optimum for better growth and recorded significant plant height (53.6 cm) at 180d after planting, maximum number of leaves/ plant (111.8) and number of side shoots/ pant (21.1) at 360d after planting, which was at par with 45 x 30 cm spacing. Flower characters such as early flowering and duration of flowering were not significantly influenced by spacing, but maximum length of floret (5.7 cm), diameter of floret (2.9 cm) and weight of 100 florets (110.4 g) were found to be  optimum as compared to closer spacing of 30×15 cm. Spike characters like early spike emergence (59.2d) with maximum spike girth (2.3 cm), weight of spike (118.3 g), number of florets per spike (51.2) and cumulative spike (4.4 spike/plant/year) were significantly higher with spacing of 45 x 30 cm and was statistically at par with spacing 30 x 30 cm. Planting of tuberose bulbs could be recommended at 30 x 30 cm spacing to obtain higher productivity of superior quality flowers and spike yield.

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Title: Effects of Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) Seed Powder on Growth Performance of Broiler Chickens

By: Maroof Ahmad, Amit Kumar and Pragati Singh

  • Abstract

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of coriander (Coriandrum sativum) seed powder on growth performance of broiler chickens. A total of 90 day-old broiler chicks procured from Central Poultry Development Organization Chandigarh were allocated randomly into three treatments group. Control group (T1): basal diet. Test group (T2): basal diet + 1.5 g coriander seed powder/kg diet and test group (T3): basal diet + 2.5 g coriander seed powder/kg diet. The ingredient composition of basal diet was maize (46%), groundnut cake (30%), rice polish (10%), fish meal (13%) and mineral mixture (1%) fortified with vitamin A, D, E, K and water soluble vitamins. Result showed that the inclusion of coriander seed powder in broiler ration (T3 group) significantly increased overall body weight and weight gain and feed consumption as compared to other groups.  These results suggest that coriander powder in the diet could replace synthetic antibiotics and could be regarded as natural feed additives and growth promoters in poultry diets.

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Title: Evaluation of Different Papaya Cultivars for Yield, Quality and Papaya Ring Spot Disease under Pune Conditions

By: S U Chalak, A B Kamble and S G Bhalekar1

  • Abstract

    Papaya (Carica papaya L) is cultivated primarily in tropical and sub tropical regions. For several decades the global production of papaya has been threatened by papaya ring spot disease (PRSV). In this context, to access the suitability of different papaya cultivars to Pune conditions nine papaya cultivars were evaluated for growth, yield, quality and PRSV incidence. Three trials of this experiment were conducted at NARP, Ganeshkhind, Pune during the year 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12. The pooled data revealed significant differences for all characters except fruit breadth. The cv Red Lady showed early flowering (70.4 DAP) which was at par with cv CO 2 (73.5 DAP), Pusa Nanha (73.7 DAP) and Pusa Dwarf (73.6 DAP). The cv Pusa Nanha recorded significantly lowest height at first flower (53.3cm).  The maximum numbers of fruit/plant were recorded in cv Pusa Nanha (33.4). The cv Pusa Giant recorded maximum fruit weight (2.1kg ) which was at par with cv Red Lady (2.0kg). The cv Pusa Giant recorded significantly maximum fruit yield/plant (66.1kg) The cv Red Leady revealed significantly superior fruit length (25.6cm) which was due to its elongated fruit shape. Regarding quality parameters viz. pulp thickness and TSS were maximum (3.1cm and 11.71 oBrix, respectively) in cv Red Lady. However, cv Pusa Majesty recorded maximum pulp yield (82.2%). Regarding PRSV incidence at 12 months after planting, it was observed that, cv Pusa Giant recorded minimum infection (65.4%), which was at par with cv CO 6 (66.0%) and CO 2 ( 66.9%). From present investigation cv Pusa Giant was found as a good yielder and also tolerant to ring spot disease among these nine papaya cultivars.

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Title: Evaluation of High Yielding Groundnut Varieties for North Eastern Zone of Tamil Nadu

By: P Murugan and P R Nis

  • Abstract

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) on farm trials was conducted by Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Kancheepuram to assess suitable drought tolerant groundnut variety in terms of yield, acceptability and adoption potential during Kharif in Kancheepuram district. The study revealed that CO 6 recorded higher pod yield (2850 kg/ ha), higher number of pods/plant (32), lesser root rot incidence (3.5 %) and optimum plant population (30.6 plants/m2) as compared to ICGV 91114 and Kadiri 9. CO 6, ICGC 91114 and Kadiri 9 recorded 49.4, 16.4 and 23.2 per cent higher yield than the check variety TMV 7, respectively. A reduction in root rot incidence and optimum plant population was observed in all the three varieties as compared to check variety. Gross and net returns were Rs.85,500/- and Rs.59,500/-ha, respectively by cultivating CO 6 as against Rs.57,240/- and Rs.33,740/-ha in the check variety.  Farmers were very satisfied with CO 6, as crop did not suffer from a dry spell of 20 – 25 days without rain. CO 6 would be a better option for rainfed cultivation in Kancheepuram district.

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Title: Evaluation of Sugarbeet Genotypes (Beta Vulgaris L.) for Root Yield and Quality Traits under Subtropical Conditions

By: Gulzar S. Sanghera, Rupinder Pal Singh, Lenika Kashyap, Vikrant Tyagi, and B Sharma

  • Abstract

    An investigation was undertaken to study the suitability of sugarbeet genotypes and to elucidate their yield related and quality characteristics under subtropical conditions during rabi 2014-2015. Thirteen sugarbeet genotypes were sown in  randomized block design (RBD) in a plot size of 36 m2 having three replications and data were recorded for germination (%), shoot length (cm), root length (cm), total length (root + shoot, in cm), shoot weight (kg), root weight (kg),  root/shoot ratio, root girth (cm), root volume (cm3), biological yield per plant (kg), harvest index (%), Brix (°), sucrose (%), purity ( %) in juice and root yield per plot (kg) were recorded. Analysis of variance was significant for traits viz: germination (%), shoot length, root length, total length, root girth, root volume, Brix (°), sucrose (%), purity (%) and root yield per plot. Germination (%) varied from 60% (Calixta) to 89.67% (Cauvery). Magnolia recorded the highest root length (31.33 cm).The most promising genotype for both root girth (cm) and root volume (cm3) respectively was Cauvery (46.25, 1755.78 cm3). Regarding quality, the superior genotype for Brix (°), sucrose (%) and purity (%) was H10671 (18.00, 15.20 and 84.42, respectively). Cauvery (194.51 kg) ranked first for root yield per plot followed by Indus (165.31 kg) and SV 892 (163.85 kg). The correlation coefficients of different traits with root yield and among themselves showed that there were highly significant and positive associations between root yield with total length. (r=0.416), shoot length (r=0.475), shoot weight (r=0.435), root girth (r=0.605), root volume(r=0.538) and germination (%) (r=0.360) while it was negatively correlated with root length and harvest index. Therefore, these traits should be given emphasis while making selections for high yielding genotypes in sugarbeet. The results revealed that the genotypes/varieties of sugarbeet are capable to produce high amounts of root yield and sugar content however, molecular basis of variability and association among the traits needs to be probed further.

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Title: Impact of Front Line Demonstration on Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.)

By: Savita Rajput, Angad singh Rajput, S K Verma and V Jain

  • Abstract

    The major constraint on of low productivity of okra in the Janjgir-Champa District of Chhattisgarh was non adoption of recommended package of practices and lack of awareness for okra cultivation. To replace this old age technology Krishi Vigyan Kendra conducted front line demonstrations during kharif season 2013 and 2014. Cultivation practices comprised use of high yielding variety (Arka anamica) at proper spacing (60×30 cm) with recommended dose of organic as well as inorganic fertilizer and plant protection measures. Results showed that average yield obtained were 75 and 80q/ ha under improved system, whereas, in local variety 62 and 65 q/ha yield was recorded during 2013 and 2014, respectively. The per cent increase in yield with high yielding over local variety was 20.9 to 23.1 per cent. The extension gap recorded was 13 and 15 per cent during 2013 and 2014, respectively

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Title: Indigenous Agricultural Practices followed for Paddy Cultivation in Ariyalur District of TamilNadu

By: G Alagukanan*, A Rajakala and Y Raja Joslin

  • Abstract

    Paddy is the major crop in Ariyalur District of TamilNadu as it occupies an area of 24,143 ha. Indigenous Agricultural Practices (IAPs) are the accumulated skill of the particular community and are unique and in harmony with the nature. An attempt was made to explore the IAPs adopted in paddy cultivation in two blocks viz., Thirumanur and T. Palur through Rapid Rural Appraisal, Personal interviews and also to work out the grand adoption percentage of IAPs in paddy cultivation. Data were collected from 120 respondents belonging  to eight villages using proportionate random sampling method. The study revealed that there were 38 IAPs categorized under six cultivation practices and the highest adoption percentage was arrived for hand weeding (100%), trimming of field bunds (100%), summer ploughing (87%), sheep penning (85%) and  shaking of seedling before transplanting (83%). The Grand Adoption percentage of IAPs in paddy at Ariyalur district was only 35 per cent and there is an ample scope to promote IAPs as a measure of sustainable agriculture by merging with other practices aiming at higher yield and income without harming environment.

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Title: Opinion of Subject Matter Specialists Working in Krishi Vigyan Kendra’s

By: Bimal P Bashir* and N Narmatha

  • Abstract

    For effective dissemination of technology from research station to land, the constraints and suggestions give by the officials had to be carefully studied. The present study was, thus conducted among subject matter specialists (SMSs) of three each from non-governmental organization and state university hosted KVKs of Tamil Nadu and Kerala. The constraints were rated in three point continuum and subsequently ranked whereas; the suggestions given were ranked based on frequencies. Interview schedule was used to elicit data from the respondents and collected information was subjected to appropriate statistical analysis. The study indicated that the major constraints faced by SMS of NGO hosted KVKs were lack of incentives, lack of clerical staffs and political interventions from the host institution in delivering their duties whereas, constraints faced by SMS of state university hosted KVK was paucity of funds, frequent transfer, lack of co-ordination among staffs etc. Major suggestion given was filling up of vacant posts of clerical staffs, provision of career advancements, promotions, reduction of paper work etc.

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Title: Performance of Exotic Mango Cultivars under Pune Conditions

By: S G Bhalekar1, S U Chalak*2 and C D Badgugar

  • Abstract

    A field investigation was carried out at NARP, Ganeshkhind, Pune in order to evaluate eight year old nine exotic mango cultivars viz. Kent, Osteen, Hy 13/3 ,Lily, Kiett, Palmer, Hy 13/1, Maya, Tommy Atkins  along with  cv   Kesar as a local check. The cv Maya recorded highest fruits/plant (93.50). The cv Kent recorded significantly superior fruit weight (328.4 g) and fruit yield (25.22 kg/plant or 5.04 Mt/ ha). It was followed by cv Maya with fruit production (17.6 kg/ plant or 3.52 Mt/ ha). The cv Keasr recorded 52.7 fruits/plant with  208.1 g average fruit weight  and  yield of 11.0 kg/plant or 2.20Mt/ha. However, from Organoleptic evaluation for quality parameters viz. pulp colour, flavor, fiber content, taste, juiciness etc. it was observed that cv Maya recorded highest overall score    (65.9 %) which was followed by cv Kesar (64.1%). As for as Indian and foreign mango market concern, it is concluded that cv Maya would be a future choice for cv

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Title: Reproductive Performance During Parasitic Load in Small Ruminants

By: Dinesh Mahto and Shobha Ran

  • Abstract

    Small ruminants were kept almost parasite free for about 3 months using Albendazole alone or supplemented with mineral mixture. Haemoglobin (Hb) level ranged between 8.83±0.08 g/dl to 8.96±0.03 g/dl in ewes and 8.78±0.02 g/dl to 8.95±0.24 g/dl in does before treatment. The level of Hb increased significantly (P<0.01) in both the treatment groups after treatment on day 20. The minimum interval from treatment to onset of estrus  were recorded in group T2 (41d in ewes and 43d in does) which was followed by group T1 (44 d in ewes and 46d in does)  and T3 group (55d in ewes and 52 d in does). The pregnancy rates in the three groups were 66.66, 83.33 and 33.33 per cent, respectively in case of does and the corresponding values in ewes were 50.00, 66.66 and 33.36 per cent, respectively.

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Title: Role of Farm Women in Rice Cultivation and their Training Needs

By: Anuradha Ranjan Kumari, Kamlesh Meena and Laxmikant1

  • Abstract

    An investigation was carried out in Deoria district of Uttar Pradesh during 2014-15. To assess the role of farm women in rice farming and their training needs. Out of Sixteen blocks three blocks namely Salempur, Bhatpar Rani and Bhatni were selected purposively for this study. From each block three villages were selected, so total nine villages were selected. Fifteen farm women from each adopted villages belonging to both the categories were selected randomly for the study. A total of 135 numbers of samples were taken for the study purpose. The role of farm women in various activities of rice cultivation was collected with the help of a pre structured interview schedule. It was concluded that all farm women participated in storage and preservation, while no one participated in land preparation. Though, the role of farm women in insect, pest and disease management was found very poor, yet, their perception for need of training on the subject secured the second highest rank i.e., behind the variety selection. Majority of farm women avail information from the co-farmers and need of the training was found immaterial for most of the farm women was detected as the major constraints in dissemination of knowledge through training

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Title: Study of Coconut Tree Climber Use Efficiency over Traditional Methods in Chitradurga District of Karnataka

By: P Kerure*, R F Channagouda, S B Salimath and S Onkarapp

  • Abstract

    Coconut is one of the most important crops under rainfed conditions in marginal soil of Chitradurga districts. Majority of the coconut growers in the district were facing the problem of theft of fallen nuts and shortage of skilled labor for nut harvesting. The traditional method of harvesting the nuts using knife with bamboo sticks for dwarf trees and climbing the tall trees was quite risky and accident prone. To overcome this problem, ICAR-Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Chitradurga conducted training programmes to unemployed rural farm youths in collaboration with Coconut Development Board, Cochin. Total 80 farm youths were trained during 2012-13. With the conventional coconut climbing, a person could harvest about 8-25 nuts/ tree while climbing the tree one had experienced body pain, muscles catch and lot of life risk with meager earnings of Rs.5,000-15,000/-year. After using the Coconut tree climber, annual income increased to Rs.20,000-60,000/-year and a person could climb more than 80-100 feet tall coconut tree without any life risk and harvesting efficiency increased to tune of 20-50 nuts/tree. This was encouraged many youths from surrounding villages to approach KVK to undergo training and choose coconut harvesting as an employment generation opportunity to meet their livelihood demand. Simultaneously, farmers were also benefitted by harvesting the nuts at right time and getting quality nuts also good price in the market

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Title: Study on Adoption of Production Technology of Soybean by Farmers in Mandsaur District of Madhya Pradesh

By: R P S Shaktawat, S P S Somvanshi and Durga Singh

  • Abstract

    The study was conducted in two villages of Mandsaur district of Madhya Pradesh. The results indicated that majority of the marginal, small and large farmers belonged to low adoption category for the practices such as seed treatment by biofertilizers, insecticides and fungicides and application of fertilizers, medium adoption for the practices such as application of herbicide and plant protection measures and high adoption for the practices such as high yielding varieties, seed rate, time of sowing, method of sowing, spacing and interculture and weeding operations of soybean production technology.

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Title: Use of Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Identifying Insect Pests and Diseases of Fruit and Vegetable Crops

By: Gagandeep Kaur*, Gurmeet Singh, Manoj Sharma, Gobinder Singh and Jatinder Manan

  • Abstract

    The main objective of Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK) is to help the farmers in the command area in the field of agriculture and allied sectors. During the last 3 years i.e. from 2013 to 2015, a record of all the visiting farmers was maintained in the plant health diagnostic laboratory at the KVK, in which complete details of the farmer with address and contact number was maintained. Similarly, the purpose of visiting KVK was recorded date wise by the KVK scientist and at the end of each month, a summary was prepared and analysed for severity of the attack of insect pest and diseases. It was found that farmers (3.6%) started enquiring about the management of fruit fly prior in Guava in the month of June. In the months of July and August, 55.6 and 44.4 per cent farmers, respectively visited the KVK to know about its management. Regarding brinjal crop, per cent farmers visited KVK during the month of June, July, August and September was 13.9, 37.9, 23.2 and 25.0, respectively. Continuous arrival of the farmers in the KVK campus in each month indicates that this crop is being attacked by insect pest and diseases throughout its whole growing period. Cauliflower crop was more prone to the attack of insect pest rather than diseases as the farmers enquired about the management of insect pests only and no diseased sample was diagnosed in the KVK. In cucurbits, maximum samples were brought by the farmers to the KVK campus as compared to other crops. Out of 31 farmers who visited KVK campus, per cent value for the months of February, March, April, May and June was 25, 12.5, 35, 24.2 and 3.3, respectively. It was also revealed that the crop was prone both to the attack of insect pests and diseases. As Krishi Vigyan Kendra imparts short duration trainings to farmers from time to time, it can be concluded that KVK staff should provide trainings relating to the above mentioned technological problems in a particular month

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Title: Socio-economic Status and Constraints Faced by Tomato Growers in Kheda District

By: P K Sharma, M K Choudhary, B S Shekhawat, K A Prajapati

Title: Evaluation of Onion (Allium Cepa L.) Varieties For Suitability in Kollam District of Kerala

By: Bindu B and Bindu Podikunju

Title: Oestrous Synchronization in Pleuriparous Dairy Cattle

By: R Thangadurai*, M A Venilla and P S Shanmugam

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